Tag Archives: studying

How to do Proper Interview Preparation

Preparation is always the key to a successful endeavour. Photo by Melissa Gogo.

Regardless of the position to which you apply, if there is an interview, you need to prepare.  Well, you don’t NEED to prepare. But others who are interviewing WILL prepare. Do you want to be competitive with those who are preparing?  Then you need to prepare, as well. Failing to prep is prepping to fail. So let’s assume you actually want the position for which you are interviewing and let’s discuss what you need to do to prepare.

First, you have to know about the position to which you are applying.  If it is a job, get the job description down cold. If it is for vet school, talk to every veterinarian you can about what it is like.  If it is for an internship or residency, read the position description and talk to your mentors about the position in detail. I advised an anesthesia residency applicant this year by giving them a 2-3 sentence assessment of each program in which they were interested. If possible, talk to people currently in the program to get an insider’s look.

The website for the institution to which you are applying may be incredibly detailed and helpful or not so much.  You should at least know their mission statement, what the program is like based on the official materials, and any other data you can find (e.g. applicant numbers or expectations).  This should take at least 30 minutes and up to 2 hours, depending on how much data they have online. Mine that data. You won’t actually know what the position entails until you have done it, but you should know as much as possible so you can interact intelligently with the interviewers.

Second, you need to practice.  You wouldn’t walk into an ice skating competition and expect to do well without practice, would you?  Unless you have been going on interviews every week for the past few months, there is no life experience that has prepared you for an interview.  So, practice. Get friends to ask you questions in a simulated setting. Studies have shown visualization activates similar pathways to actual practice, so run through questions and scenarios in your mind.  The more you practice the specific skill of interviewing, the better.

Third, you need to study.  Watch TED videos about effective interviews and discussion skills (the body language talk is revolutionary).  Read forum posts about interviews. Read this blog from beginning to end, taking notes all along.  Research potential interview questions and write down possible responses. You would study for months for the NAVLE, wouldn’t you?  How is an interview dictating the next step of your professional life any less important?

I cannot impress this upon you enough: just waltzing into an interview isn’t going to impress anyone, and it will significantly harm your chances of a positive outcome.  You’re a veterinary professional, for god’s sake; you’ve spent countless hours studying for classes and applying to programs and everything else involved in this demanding field!  Don’t tell me for one second you can’t do interview prep. If every applicant did good interview prep, I would be over-the-moon happy. Please help make that happen.

With These 5 Steps, You CAN Pass Your Specialty Board Exam

Photo by Tamarcus Brown on Unsplash

The road to veterinary specialization is a long, arduous one.  First, you have to get into vet school and excel there. Then you do post-graduate training: an internship (for clinical disciplines) and then a residency.  Towards the end of your residency, you have to submit your credentials to demonstrate you are qualified to take the specialty exam. Everything leads up to the exam, which, if you pass, makes you a Board Certified Specialist.

Many board exams have a pass rate around 50%.  So even AFTER all that arduous training, as well as studying for the exam, your odds of passing are like flipping a coin.  Even very smart people sometimes don’t pass boards. Some people, unfortunately, never pass their board exam. Fortunately, passing is not random, and you can take steps to maximize your chance of success.

1) Kick ass during your residency.  “Those who do the work do the learning.”  This is an oft-repeated phrase for classroom teachers, but it applies here.  If you phone in your rounds participation or your resident prep topics, you will have more to study prior to boards.  Take every opportunity to learn during your program. Notice I don’t say ‘work harder’- everyone works hard during their residency.  YOU can work smarter. You are earning low pay in a time-consuming, soul-crushing training program: get what you can from it.

2) Get perspective.  I only spent 3 weeks at a human hospital during my residency, but I learned a tremendous amount during that time.  My experiences during an anesthesia externship in Dublin and a critical care externship in Colorado dramatically improved my understanding of important, universal concepts.  As much as possible, seek out opportunities to learn from a wide spectrum of people during your residency.

3) Get time off.  Wherever you go after your residency, you NEED to negotiate for time off to study.  This should be time off from clinics, teaching, and most other responsibilities. You need to be able to dedicate a solid 6-10 hours a day to studying, and you can’t do that if you’re preparing for a classroom course or covering on call time.  This needs to be IN WRITING before you accept any job

4) Study seriously.  Get organized. Don’t blow off days.  Make progress every day. Find an accountability program or app if you need to.  It seems redundant for me to say “be motivated,” but I have met many people studying for boards who do not seem particularly motivated.  If this describes you, come up with some mechanisms which works for you. Play Minecraft and, during the Minecraft night, study. Read a Cracked article for every hour you study.  I had to go to Jason’s Deli to study because otherwise I had too many distractions. Whatever you need to motivate you, do that.

5) Practice.  Cooperate with others preparing for boards and give each other questions.  They can help hold you accountable. Ask your mentors (or former mentors) for any practice questions they may have.  When the anesthesia college used to do oral exams, my impression is that most people failed because they didn’t have a strategy, not because they lacked the knowledge.

The specialty board exam is the culmination of at least 10 years (and often much more) of higher education.  Why would you not dedicate every single resource at your disposal to successfully passing? Work smart, learn from many people, have dedicated time to study, be serious about studying, and practice.  It’s not a guarantee of passing, but it’s the best chance you have?